Opioid Epidemic: Addiction Statistics

The opioid epidemic is considered a public health emergency, with 136 deaths per day and climbing.

Highlights

50K
Almost 50,000 people die every year from opioid overdose.
10M
Over 10 million people misuse opioids in a year.
72%
Opioids are a factor in at least 7 out of every 10 overdose deaths

Line Graph: Comparative Overdose Deaths per 100,000 Residents, including all drugs and any opioids

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Opioid Epidemic Statistics

In response to the opioid epidemic, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) officially declared a public health emergency in 2017.

  • 49,860 people overdosed on opioids in 2019.
  • 3.8% of American adults abuse opioids each year.
  • At least 71.8% and as many as 80% of overdose deaths involve opioids.
  • Overdose (OD) deaths involving opioids increased 519.38% from 1999 to 2019.
  • 68.0% of all OD deaths are attributed to synthetic opioids.
  • Fentanyl and fentanyl analogs are a factor in 19.8% of all overdose deaths.
  • 0.7% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal (NOW) syndrome.
  • 2.4 million cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use (IDU).
  • 1 million cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to IDU.

Opioid Abuse Statistics

Statistics indicate that while new users may be on the decline, opioid abuse is still a widespread and deadly practice.

  • 3.10 million people abused opioids in the past month, an average 103,333 people using per day.
  • 10.07 million people aged 12 years and older abused opioids in 2019.
  • This is down 1.5% from 2018 when 10.25 million people abused opioids.
  • 745,000 people abused heroin last year.

Opioid Abuse Among Demographics

Males consistently abuse opioids more than females except among 12- to 17-year-olds.

  • Adult usage is most prevalent among people of two or more races (5.7%) and American Indian or Alaska Native people (5.4%).
  • Annual usage grew between 2018 and 2019 among Asians (+38.5%), people of two or more races (+21.3%), and Hispanic or Latino people (+8.3%)
  • People with some college or an associate’s degree are most likely to use opioids, with 4.2% using in 2019.
  • Also in 2019, opioid use increased among college graduates (+12% from 2018) and those who did not complete high school 8.1%.
  • 7% of unemployed adults misused opioids in 2019, down from 8.8% in 2018.
  • 3.6% of part-time employees misused opioids in 2019, down from 4.2% in 2018.
  • Opioid abuse increased among full-time employees, to 3.9% up from 3.8%..

Overall opioid abuse has declined among teenagers, possibly due to more aggressive education strategies.

  • 2.3% of people aged 12 to 17 years abused opioids in 2019.
  • This is down 17.86% from 2018 when 2.8% of people aged 12 to 17 abused opioids.
  • 0.7% of people aged 12 to 17 abused opioids in the past month.
  • 3.4% of Hispanic or Latino teenagers aged 12 to 17 misuse opioids in a year.
  • Teenagers who legitimately use prescribed opioids are 33% more likely to misuse opioids after high school.
  • 112,000 12- and 13-year-olds used opioids in 2019, a 12.5% decline from the previous year.
  • Opioid use also declined 17.4% among 14- and 15-year olds and by 22.3% among 16- and 17-year-olds.
  • 1.4% of 12- and 13-year-olds misused opioids in 2019.
  • 2.1% of 14- and 15-year olds and 3.4% of 16- and 17-year-olds misued opioids.
Opioid Subcategories
Natural opioids include morphine and codeine.
Semi-synthetic opioids include oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone.
Methadone is a synthetic opioid that is usually categorized on its own in official data.
Synthetic opioids other than methadone include tramadol and fentanyl.
Heroin is an illegally manufactured synthetic opioid made from morphine.

Fentanyl

Fentanyl is the deadliest of all opioids. It is widely available, and often used to supplement other types of opioids.

  • 42,700 people overdose on fentanyl in a year.
  • Fentanyl OD rates are rising 2.5 times faster than heroin ODs.
  • Fentanyl ODs outpace prescription opioid ODs 550.94%.
  • The effective dose-to-lethal dose ratio is 1:4.
  • 1 kilogram of fentanyl contains 250,000 lethal doses.

Read our related report on Fentanyl Abuse.

Opioid Prescription Dispense Rates
Year Total Prescriptions Prescriptions per 100 People
2006 216M 72.4
2007 229M 75.9
2008 238M 78.2
2009 244M 79.5
2010 251M 81.2
2011 252M 80.9
2012 255M 81.3
2013 247M 80.9
2014 241M 81.3
2015 227M 78.1
2016 215M 66.5
2017 192M 59.0
2018 168M 51.4
2019 153M 46.7

Prescription Opioids

The rate of opioid prescriptions does not appear to have a direct effect on the number of prescription overdoses.

  • Up to 92% of opioid abusers use prescription opioids at least once in a year.
  • Prescription opioid abuse costs $78.5 billion annually in the form of healthcare, legal programs, and lost productivity.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 32% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Pharmacies fill 153 million opioid prescriptions in a year.
  • Doctors write enough opioid prescriptions for 46.7% of Americans to receive one.
  • This is 9.1% lower than the previous year’s prescription rate.

Read our related report on Prescription Drug Abuse.

Heroin

Reduced prescription availability appears to correlate with an increase in heroin usage.

  • 80% of heroin users have used prescription opioids as well.
  • 15,000 annual opioid overdoses involve heroin.
  • 7.27% of opioid abusers use heroin.
  • Washington D.C. has the highest rate of heroin overdose in the nation by 24.3%.

Line Graph: Comparative Opioid Overdose Deaths per 100,000 Residents, Synthetic Opioids, Natural and Semisynthetic opioids, heroin, and methadone

Opioid Epidemic by State

State trends depict different stages of the opioid epidemic, such as synthetic opioid deaths surpassing and supplanting heroin opioid deaths.

  • West Virginia has the highest rate of opioid overdose deaths per capita.
  • West Virginia also has the highest rate of neonatal opioid withdrawal (NOW) syndrome cases.
  • New Hampshire has the highest rate of opioid overdose among all overdose deaths at 91.2%.
  • New Hampshire also has the highest rate of overdose involving synthetic opioids at 93.7% and the lowest rate of prescription opioid overdose at 10.4%.
  • Wyoming and Utah both have the highest rate of opioid overdose involving prescription opioids at 70%.
  • Rhode Island has the lowest rate of overdose involving heroin at 9%.
  • Washington D.C. and Vermont have the highest rates of overdose involving heroin at 66.5% and 53.5%, respectively.
  • Washington D.C. also has the lowest rate of opioid prescriptions and the lowest rate of NOW syndrome cases at 0.1%.
  • Utah has the lowest rate of overdose involving synthetic opioids at 19%.
State-level opioid overdose statistics
State Opioid OD Deaths Deaths per 100,000
Alabama 381 8.3
Alaska 68 8.8
Arizona 1,106 15.9
Arkansas 208 7.4
California 2,400 5.8
Colorado 564 9.5
Connecticut 948 27.5
Delaware 355 38.8
D.C. 191 26.7
Florida 3,189 15.8
Georgia 866 8.3
Hawaii 59 4.1
Idaho 120 7.0
Illinois 2,169 17.0
Indiana 1,104 17.5
Iowa 143 4.8
Kansas 156 5.6
Kentucky 989 23.4
Louisiana 444 9.9
Maine 282 23.4
Maryland 2,987 33.7
Massachusetts 1,991 29.3
Michigan 2,011 20.8
Minnesota 343 6.3
Mississippi 173 6.1
Missouri 1,132 19.6
Montana 64 6.2
Nebraska 63 3.4
Nevada 372 11.5
New Hampshire 412 33.1
New Jersey 2,583 29.5
New Mexico 338 16.7
New York 2,991 15.1
North Carolina 1,783 17.9
North Dakota 36 5.2
Ohio 3,237 29.6
Oklahoma 308 7.8
Oregon 339 8.0
Pennsylvania 2,866 23.4
Rhode Island 267 25.9
South Carolina 835 17.1
South Dakota 28 3.4
Tennessee 1,307 19.9
Texas 1,402 4.8
Utah 437 14.8
Vermont 127 22.8
Virginia 1,193 14.3
Washington 737 9.4
West Virginia 702 42.4
Wisconsin 846 15.3
Wyoming 40 6.8

Alabama

  • 381 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 49.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 8.3 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 43.2% less than the national death rate.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 97.5% of residents to have one.
  • 30,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 13,124 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Alaska

  • 68 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 55.9% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 42.6% of deaths.
  • 26.5% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 61.8% of all overdose deaths.
  • 8.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 39.7% below the national death rate.
  • 1.16% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 44.9% of residents to have one.
  • 61,500 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 720 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Arizona

  • 1,106 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 31.3% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 32.7% of deaths.
  • 47.2% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 66.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 15.9 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 8.9% above the national death rate.
  • 0.8% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 50.7% of residents to have one.
  • 61,500 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 16,062 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Arkansas

  • 208 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 46.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 7.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 49.3% below or nearly half the national death rate.
  • 0.43% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 93% of residents to have one.
  • 21,800 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 5,634 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

California

  • 2,400 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 45.2% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 32.4% of deaths.
  • 36% deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 45.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 5.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 60.3% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.25% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 45.7% of residents to have one.
  • 318,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 129,153 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Colorado

  • 564 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 47.5% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 41.3% of deaths.
  • 23.8% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 56.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 9.5 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 34.9% below the national death rate.
  • 0.54% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 45.1% of residents to have one.
  • 36,800 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 12,352 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Connecticut

  • 948 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 24.4% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 35.7% of deaths.
  • 83% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 88.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 27.5 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 88.4% above the national death rate.
  • 0.97% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 43% of residents to have one.
  • 18,300 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 10,328 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Delaware

  • 355 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 88.5% of all overdose deaths.
  • 38.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 165.8% above or more than twice the national death rate.
  • 2.43% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 60.6% of residents to have one.
  • 6,300 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 3,285 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

District of Columbia

  • 191 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 21.5% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 66.5% deaths.
  • 84.8% deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 75.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 26.7 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 82.9% above the national death rate.
  • 0.1% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 25% of residents to have one.
  • 12,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 14,316 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Florida

  • 3,189 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 40.2% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 21.6% of deaths.
  • 65.6% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 67.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 15.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 8.2% above the national death rate.
  • 0.73% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 53.7% of residents to have one.
  • 151,000 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 110,034 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Georgia

  • 866 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 50.8% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 34.5% of deaths.
  • 40.3% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 61.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 8.3 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 43.2% below the national death rate.
  • 0.34% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 63.2% of residents to have one.
  • 56,800 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 52,528 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Hawaii

  • 59 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 55.9% of OD deaths.
  • Opioids are a factor in 27.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 4.1 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 71.9% below or nearly one-quarter the national death rate.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 33.4% of residents to have one.
  • 6,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 2,524 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Idaho

  • 120 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 48% of all overdose deaths.
  • 7 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 52.1% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 61.9% of residents to have one.
  • 11,200 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 1,145 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Illinois

  • 2,169 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 24.9% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 48.4% of deaths.
  • 72.3% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 79.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 17 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 16.4% above the national death rate.
  • 0.31% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 45.2% of residents to have one.
  • 54,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 128,153 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Indiana

  • 1,104 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 33.5% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 28.2% of deaths.
  • 64.6% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 67.8% of all overdose deaths.
  • 17.5 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 19.9% above the national death rate.
  • 1.04% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 65.8% of residents to have one.
  • 40,200 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 11,218 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Iowa

  • 143 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 44.8% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 25.9% of deaths.
  • 55.9% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 49.8% of all overdose deaths.
  • 4.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 67.1% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.29% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 49.3% of residents to have one.
  • 12,600 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 2,671 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Kansas

  • 156 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 45.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 5.6 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 61.6% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.37% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 64.3% of residents to have one.
  • 14,600 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 2,997 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Kentucky

  • 989 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 31.9% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 14.2% of deaths.
  • 75.2% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 75.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 23.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 60.3% more than the national death rate.
  • 2.36% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 79.5% of residents to have one.
  • 42,500 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 7,108 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Louisiana

  • 444 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 38.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 9.9 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 32.2% below the national death rate.
  • 0.56% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 79.4% of residents to have one.
  • 50,000 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 20,424 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Maine

  • 282 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 24.5% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 25.2% of deaths.
  • 81.2% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 81.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 23.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 60.3% above the national death rate.
  • 2.83% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 48.1% of residents to have one.
  • 7,000 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 1,576 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Maryland

  • 2,087 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 27.6% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 17.1% of deaths.
  • 87.4% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 88.1% of all overdose deaths.
  • 33.7 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 130.8% above or more than twice the national death rate.
  • 1.43% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 45.1% of residents to have one.
  • 38,100 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 20,374 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Massachusetts

  • 1,991 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 16.6% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 23.9% of deaths.
  • 90.7% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 88.8% of all overdose deaths.
  • 29.3 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 100.7% above or more than twice the national death rate.
  • 1.37% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 35.3% of residents to have one.
  • 38,100 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 20,374 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Michigan

  • 2,011 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 27.6% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 31.5% of deaths.
  • 76.1% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 77.6% of all overdose deaths.
  • 20.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 42.5% above the national death rate.
  • 0.8% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 62.7% of residents to have one.
  • 69,100 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 15,667 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Minnesota

  • 343 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 39.7% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 27.1% of deaths.
  • 58.9% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 53.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 6.3 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 56.8% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.48% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 35.5% of residents to have one.
  • 24,300 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 8,304 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Mississippi

  • 173 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 22.5% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 53.2% of deaths.
  • 41.6% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 55.8% of all overdose deaths.
  • 6.1 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 58.2% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.24% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 76.8% of residents to have one.
  • 22.900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 9,399 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Missouri

  • 1,132 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 23.4% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 31% of deaths.
  • 76.7% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 70.3% of all overdose deaths.
  • 19.6 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 34.2% above the national death rate.
  • 0.52% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 63.4% of residents to have one.
  • 40,300 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 12,308 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Montana

  • 64 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 51.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 6.2 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 57.5% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 54% of residents to have one.
  • 7,400 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 625 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Nebraska

  • 63 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 45.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 3.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 76.7% below or less than one-quarter the national death rate.
  • 0.15% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 50.6% of residents to have one.
  • 7,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 2,136 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Nevada

  • 372 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 63.2% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 29% of deaths.
  • 22.8% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 54.1% of all overdose deaths.
  • 11.5 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 21.2% below the national death rate.
  • 0.77% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 55.5% of residents to have one.
  • 21,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 9,609 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

New Hampshire

  • 412 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 10.4% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • 93.7% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 91.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 33.1 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 126.7% above or more than twice the national death rate.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 46.1% of residents to have one.
  • 7,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.

New Jersey

  • 2,583 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 89.1% of all overdose deaths.
  • 29.5 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 102.1% above or more than twice the national death rate.
  • 0.67% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 38.9% of residents to have one.
  • 47,200 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 34,891 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

New Mexico

  • 338 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 52.1% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 38.5% of deaths.
  • 31.1% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 62.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 16.7 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 14.4% above the national death rate.
  • 1.51% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 49.4% of residents to have one.
  • 26,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 3,428 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

New York

  • 2,991 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 33.4% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 41.6% of deaths.
  • 73.4% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 80.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 15.1 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 3.4% above the national death rate.
  • 1.47% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 34% of residents to have one.
  • 116,000 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 126,495 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

North Carolina

  • 1,783 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 27.4% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 34.7% of deaths.
  • 71.3% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 78.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 17.9 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 22.6% above the national death rate.
  • 1.05% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 61.5% of residents to have one.
  • 66,400 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 30,953 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

North Dakota

  • 36 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 51.4% of all overdose deaths.
  • 5.2 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 6.4% below the national death rate.
  • 0.39% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 37.4% of residents to have one.
  • 2,600 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 407 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Ohio

  • 3,237 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 14.6% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 22.3% of deaths.
  • 86% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 81.3% of all overdose deaths.
  • 29.6 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 102.7% above or more than twice the national death rate.
  • 1.16% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 53.5% of residents to have one.
  • 89,600 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 21,899 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Oklahoma

  • 308 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 55.8% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 27.3% of deaths.
  • 25.6% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 43% of all overdose deaths.
  • 7.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 46.6% below or nearly half the national death rate.
  • 0.68% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 79.1% of residents to have one.
  • 53,300 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 6,216 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Oregon

  • 339 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 44.5% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 45.4% of deaths.
  • 28.6% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 62% of all overdose deaths.
  • 8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 45.2% below the national death rate.
  • 0.62% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 57.3% of residents to have one.
  • 48,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 6,879 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Pennsylvania

  • 2,866 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 64.9% of all overdose deaths.
  • 23.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 60.3% above the national death rate.
  • 1.48% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 49.9% of residents to have one.
  • 93,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 35,520 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Rhode Island

  • 267 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 31.8% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 9% of deaths.
  • 79.8% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 84.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 25.9 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 77.4% above the national death rate.
  • 1.17% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 43% of residents to have one.
  • 10,000 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 2,547 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

South Carolina

  • 835 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 44.9% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 21.9% of deaths.
  • 61.1% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 74.2% of all overdose deaths.
  • 17.1 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 17.1% above the national death rate.
  • 0.5% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 69.2% of residents to have one.
  • 35,600 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 16,858 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

South Dakota

  • 28 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Opioids are a factor in 49.1% of all overdose deaths.
  • 3.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 76.7% below or less than one-quarter the national death rate.
  • 0.17% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 42.6% of residents to have one.
  • 3,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 568 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Tennessee

  • 1,307 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 42.1% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 28.2% of deaths.
  • 63.3% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 71.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 19.9 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 36.3% above the national death rate.
  • 1.64% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 81.8% of residents to have one.
  • 69,100 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 16,612 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Texas

  • 1,402 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 39% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 47.6% of deaths.
  • 25.5% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 46.7% of all overdose deaths.
  • 4.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 67.1% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.25% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 47.2% of residents to have one.
  • 205,500 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 88,099 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Utah

  • 437 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 70% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 35.7% of deaths.
  • 19% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 70% of all overdose deaths.
  • 14.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 1.4% above the national death rate.
  • 0.64% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 57.1% of residents to have one.
  • 12,300 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 2,757 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Vermont

  • 127 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 21.3% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 53.5% of deaths.
  • 83.5% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 83% of all overdose deaths.
  • 22.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 56.2% above the national death rate.
  • 2.83% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 42.4% of residents to have one.
  • 3,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 693 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Virginia

  • 1,193 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 27.3% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 44.6% of deaths.
  • 71.4% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 82.4% of all overdose deaths.
  • 14.3 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 2.1% below the national death rate.
  • 0.76% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 44.8% of residents to have one.
  • 39,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 22,149 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Washington

  • 737 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 40.8% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 44.5% of deaths.
  • 30% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 63.3% of all overdose deaths.
  • 9.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 35.6% below the national death rate.
  • 0.97% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 49.3% of residents to have one.
  • 54,200 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 13,205 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

West Virginia

  • 702 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 33.3% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 27.8% of deaths.
  • 78.5% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 82% of all overdose deaths.
  • 42.4 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 190.4% above or nearly three times the national death rate.
  • 5.62% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 69.3% of residents to have one.
  • 20,600 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 1,820 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Wisconsin

  • 846 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 35.6% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Heroin is a factor in 38.7% of deaths.
  • 59.8% of deaths involve synthetic opioids.
  • Opioids are a factor in 78.4% of all overdose deaths.
  • 15.3 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 4.8% above the national death rate.
  • 0.85% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 45.8% of residents to have one.
  • 27,900 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 6,216 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Wyoming

  • 40 people die from opioid overdose in one year.
  • Prescription opioids are a factor in 70% of opioid overdose deaths.
  • Opioids are a factor in 60.6% of all overdose deaths.
  • 6.8 out of every 100,000 residents die from an opioid overdose.
  • That’s 53.4% below or less than half the national death rate.
  • 0.49% of hospital births are cases of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Doctors write enough prescriptions for 57.1% of residents to have one.
  • 3,700 cases of hepatitis C are attributed to intravenous drug use.
  • 326 cases of HIV/AIDS are attributed to intravenous drug use.

Opioid Overdose Statistics

  • The national opioid overdose death rate increases by an average of 21.7% annually.

Signs of an Overdose

If you know someone who uses opioids, watch for these overdose symptoms.

  • Cold, clammy skin
  • Cyanosis
  • Pinpoint Pupils
  • Slowed respiration
  • Unconsciousness*

*If someone is sleeping or unconscious, move them into the recovery position.

Illustration of someone in the Recovery Position

Recovery Position

After calling 911, place any unconscious person in the recovery position; this allows any bodily fluids to drain out of the mouth and nose.

  1. Place the person on their side.
  2. Bend their knees (as in the fetal position).
  3. Rest their head on top of the arm closest to the floor.

Sources

  1. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 2019 National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) Releases
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Most Overdose Deaths Involve Illicitly Manufactured Fentanyls
  3. CDC, Overdose Deaths and the Involvement of Illicit Drugs
  4. American Academy of Pediatrics, Prescription Opioids in Adolescence and Future Opioid Misuse
  5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, What is the U.S. Opioid Epidemic?
  6. National Institute on Drug Abuse, Opioid Summaries by State