Alcohol Abuse Statistics

Alcohol abuse, alcoholism, and alcohol use disorder (AUD) kill over 3 million people each year, accounting for up to 6% of global deaths.

Highlights

95K
Americans die from the effects of alcohol use every year.
7%
Drinking adults have AUD.
60%
People increased their alcohol consumption during COVID-19 lockdowns.

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Alcohol Abuse Statistics

Most American adults consume alcohol at least once in their lifetime. Among them, 6.7% will develop Alcohol Use Disorder.

  • 25.8% of people aged 18 years and older report binge drinking in the past 30 days.
  • Every day, 261 Americans die as a result of excessive alcohol use.
  • 80% of these deaths involve adults aged 35 or older.
  • Alcohol causes 10% of deaths among 15- to 49-year-olds.
  • Worldwide, up to 3.3 million people die every year as a result of alcohol abuse.
  • Alcohol-related deaths account for at least 5.3% (some estimate as high as 6.0%) of the world’s deaths.
  • Alcohol causes 13.5% of deaths among 20- to 39-year-olds.
  • Men are 3 times as likely as women to die as a consequence of alcohol abuse.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) has determined excessive alcohol use is responsible for 7.1% of disease among males and 2.2% among females.
  • Collectively, Americans lose over 2.7 million years of potential life due to excessive drinking.

Pie Chart: COVID Effect on Alcohol Consumption

Alcohol Abuse & COVID-19

Economists as well as healthcare and addiction specialists agree the pandemic and quarantines of 2020 had a significant impact on nationwide alcohol consumption.

  • Online liquor sales rose 262% year-over-year (YoY) in the first 3 weeks of March, coinciding with most state-wide lockdowns.
  • Liquor store sales increased 54% YoY during that same time period.
  • In April 2020, YoY alcohol sales were up 234%.
  • In a Johns Hopkins-University of Maryland-Baltimore survey, 60.1% of participants report drinking more alcohol after March 1, 2020.
  • 34.1% report binge drinking at least once; 7.0% report extreme binge drinking.
  • 45.7% report increased stress as a reason for their increased drinking.
  • Other reasons for increased drinking include increased alcohol availability (34.4%) and boredom (30.1%).
  • Also in March, 180 people died in Iran after consuming homemade alcohol due to the rumor that it would protect them from COVID.
  • Similar deaths occurred in nations where alcohol is illegal and often includes toxins.[1]

Alcohol Abuse & Children

Children aged 17 years and younger are much more likely to live with an alcoholic parent than they are to be diagnosed with a learning disability or ADHD.

  • 1.7% of 12- to 17-year-olds have AUD.
  • Females aged 12 to 17 years are 61.5% more likely to have AUD than their male peers.
  • 12.1% of children 17 years and under live with at least one parent with alcohol use disorder.
  • Among them, 18.7% live in single-parent households.
  • Children living in single-parent households are 47.6% more likely to live with an alcoholic father than they are an alcoholic mother.
  • 9.3% of single fathers are alcoholic while 6.3% of single mothers are alcoholic.
  • Intoxicated adults are responsible for 150 child deaths every year.
  • Among kids living with substance abusing parents, 86.2% live with a parent who abuses alcohol.

Analysis: Emerging Trends in Alcohol Abuse

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has identified an emerging trend that it has labeled “High-Intensity Drinking.” The definition of High-Intensity Drinking (HID) includes the consumption of “alcohol at levels that are two or more times the gender-specific binge drinking thresholds”.[2]

Due to its status as an emerging trend, there are few peer-reviewed studies. Available data indicate HID is common among binge drinkers and that it is typically associated with special occasions “including holidays, sporting events, and, notably, 21st birthdays.”[3]

  • HID behavior peaks at age 21.
  • Between 80% and 90% of 21st birthday celebrants consume alcohol.
  • Males are consistently twice as likely to report excessive alcohol use than females.
  • HID is associated with negative consequences, such as injury and aggression.
  • 12.4% of young adults aged 25 and 26 report at least one instance of HID in within the previous 14 days.
  • Each year, 97,000 sexual assaults among American college students involve alcohol.

Alcohol-Related Illness and Death

Nearly 100,000 annual deaths are attributable to alcohol abuse. More than half of them are due to long-term use.

  • Alcoholic liver disease is the leading killer, causing 19.1% of all alcohol-related deaths.
  • 53.7% of alcohol-related deaths are due to chronic misuse.
  • 52.4% of chronic misuse deaths are attributable to alcohol alone; 47.6% include additional factors, such as other chronic health issues or drug abuse.
  • Alcohol poisoning another leading killer, causing 32% of acute alcohol-related deaths.
  • 22.5% of acute-alcohol related deaths are due to suicide.
  • Suicides involving alcohol kill more people than car accidents involving alcohol, which account for 16.1% of acute-alcohol related deaths.

National Map charting Underage Victims Among Alcohol-Related Deaths

Alcohol Deaths & Demographics

Alcohol Use Disorder and alcoholism have damaged some groups or demographics more than others. Alcohol abuse statistics indicate some inequalities may be due to social conditioning.

  • 71.4% of alcohol-related deaths are men.
  • Excessive drinking kills 3,504 Americans under the age of 21 each year; 77.5% of them are male.
  • 34.7% of people who die from alcohol are between the ages of 50 and 64 years old.
  • 18.1% of people who die from alcohol are under the age of 35.
  • 58.1% of people killed in alcohol-related car crashes are between the ages of 20 and 34 years old.
  • 50- to 64-year-olds are more than twice as likely to die from chronic alcohol abuse than from acute alcohol-related causes.
  • Teenagers who die from alcohol are over 50 times more likely to die from acute causes, such as suicide or car accidents, than of chronic conditions such as liver disease.
Alcohol-Related Deaths by State
State Total Deaths % Under 21
Alabama 1,504 4.5%
Alaska 297 4.7%
Arizona 2,629 3.0%
Arkansas 923 4.0%
California 11.0K 3.3%
Colorado 1,821 3.2%
Connecticut 913 3.4%
Delaware 278 4.3%
District of Columbia 219 4.6%
Florida 6,903 3.0%
Georgia 2,637 4.2%
Hawaii 349 3.4%
Idaho 493 3.7%
Illinois 3,391 4.9%
Indiana 1,946 4.0%
Iowa 841 3.1%
Kansas 764 4.1%
Kentucky 1,552 3.2%
Louisiana 1,591 5.3%
Maine 427 2.3%
Maryland 1,505 4.4%
Massachusetts 1,744 2.8%
Michigan 3,205 3.9%
Minnesota 1,343 3.1%
Mississippi 954 4.9%
Missouri 1,913 4.7%
Montana 416 3.6%
Nebraska 460 4.1%
Nevada 1,051 2.9%
New Hampshire 421 2.1%
New Jersey 2,016 3.7%
New Mexico 1,145 2.9%
New York 4,473 3.2%
North Carolina 2,876 3.8%
North Dakota 216 3.7%
Ohio 3,674 3.5%
Oklahoma 1,497 3.8%
Oregon 1,508 2.1%
Pennsylvania 3,843 3.8%
Rhode Island 339 2.4%
South Carolina 1,679 4.3%
South Dakota 283 4.6%
Tennessee 2,151 3.7%
Texas 7,245 4.8%
Utah 686 4.2%
Vermont 203 2.5%
Virginia 2,011 3.7%
Washington 2,214 2.8%
West Virginia 738 2.4%
Wisconsin 1,737 3.2%
Wyoming 237 3.8%

U.S. Map: Alcohol-Related Deaths per 10,000 Adults

Alcohol Abuse & Death by State

State-level data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reflects trends as they were in the first half of the 2010s. More recent data is available from some individual state agencies; collection methodology is not uniform, however.

  • The CDC collected state-level data regarding alcohol consumption from 2011 to 2015.
  • State averages will not necessarily equal the national average due to population variations.
  • State totals exclude territories and unspecified residency and will not necessarily equal the national total.

Alabama

Alabama has a high rate of under-21 deaths.

  • 1,504 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.7% of these deaths are male.
  • 45.1% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 78.0% of deaths are 35 years old or more.
  • 4.5% are under 21 years old.
  • The CDC estimates 46,347 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Alabama averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,538 people over 18 or 3.9 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Alaska

Alaska has the nation’s second-highest number of alcohol-related deaths per capita. It also sees the highest rate of female deaths.

  • 297 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 67.3% of these deaths are male.
  • 46.1% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 76.1% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 9,794 years of total potential life lost to alcohol among Alaskans.
  • Alaska averages one alcohol-related death for every 1,857 adults over 18 or 5.4 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Arizona

Arizona has a high number of alcohol-related deaths compared to its population. The rate of chronic causes is well above average.

  • 2,629 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.2% of these deaths are male.
  • 57.1% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 83.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.0% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 76,039 years of total potential life lost to alcohol in Arizona.
  • Arizona averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,146 adults over 18 or 4.7 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Arkansas

Arkansas has more alcohol-related deaths per capita than a majority of states and a higher rate of underage drinking.

  • 923 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.0% of these deaths are male.
  • 46.8% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 79.6% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.0% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 27,699 years of total potential life lost to alcohol among the population of Arkansas.
  • Arkansas averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,511 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

California

California sees the nation’s highest number of alcohol-related deaths but has a low rate of underage drinking.

  • 11,026 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.2% of these deaths are male.
  • 60.0% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 84.3% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.3% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 308,831 years of total potential life lost to alcohol among Californians.
  • California averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,777 adults over 18 or 3.6 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Colorado

Women are more likely to suffer alcohol-related death in Colorado.

  • 1,821 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 68.5% of these deaths are male.
  • 56.3% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 82.6% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.2% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 54,564 years of total potential life lost to alcohol among citizens of Colorado.
  • Colorado averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,470 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Connecticut

Connecticut’s alcohol-related death rate is 17.9% below the national average.

  • 913 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.6% of these deaths are male.
  • 52.1% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 81.8% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.4% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 26,366 years of total potential life lost to alcohol among residents of Connecticut.
  • Connecticut averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,108 adults over 18 or 3.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Delaware

Delaware has an alcohol-related death rate that is lower than average, but the state sees a higher rate of under-21 deaths.

  • 278 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.2% of deaths are male.
  • 48.2% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 79.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.3% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 8,445 years of total potential life lost to alcohol among residents of Delaware.
  • Delaware averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,771 adults over 18 or 3.6 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

District of Columbia

The District of Columbia has an alcohol-related death rate below the national average but a high rate of under-21 deaths.

  • 219 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.2% of deaths are male.
  • 53.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 79.9% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.6% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 6,440 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • The District of Columbia averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,636 adults over 18 or 3.8 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Florida

Florida has an elevated alcohol-related death rate but one of the lowest rates of under-21 deaths.

  • 6,903 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.2% of deaths are male.
  • 57.5% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 84.6% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.0% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 188,713 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Florida averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,498 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Georgia

Statistics indicate Georgia has a higher rate of underage drinkers than the majority of states.

  • 2,637 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.8% of deaths are male.
  • 49.8% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 80.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.2% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 79,017 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Georgia averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,035 adults over 18 or 3.3 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Hawaii

Male alcohol-related deaths in Hawaii are the nation’s highest.

  • 349 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 75.6% of deaths are male.
  • 54.4% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 84.8% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.4% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 9,482 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Hawaii averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,197 adults over 18 or 3.1 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Idaho

Alcohol-related deaths in Idaho are more likely to be older, chronic alcohol users.

  • 493 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.6% of deaths are male.
  • 56.4% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 84.4% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 14,099 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Idaho averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,715 adults over 18 or 3.7 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Illinois

Statistics indicate Illinois may have a significant underage drinking problem as it sees the nation’s second-highest rate of under-21 alcohol-related deaths.

  • 3,391 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.3% of deaths are male.
  • 52.4% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 79.1% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.9% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 100,018 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Illinois averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,907 adults over 18 or 3.4 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Indiana

Alcohol-related deaths in Indiana are more likely to involve underage drinkers.

  • 1,946 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.1% of deaths are male.
  • 50.0% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 79.9% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.0% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 58,407 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Indiana averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,653 adults over 18 or 3.8 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Iowa

Statistics indicate Iowa is one of the nation’s leaders in chronic abuse among its alcohol-related deaths.

  • 841 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 73.1% of deaths are male.
  • 59.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 86.2% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 22,266 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Iowa averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,889 adults over 18 or 3.5 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Kansas

Alcohol-related deaths in Kansas are slightly more likely to involve males and underage drinkers.

  • 764 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.9% of deaths are male.
  • 49.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 80.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 22,725 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Kansas averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,898 adults over 18 or 3.5 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Kentucky

Kentucky is a statistical anomaly with a low rate of underage drinking deaths and a low rate of chronic causes. This is apparently due to an exceptionally high rate of poisoning deaths.

  • 1,552 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 21.9% of alcohol-related deaths are ruled poisonings (compared to a national average of 12.4%).
  • 72.2% of deaths are male.
  • 47.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 81.8% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 46,452 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Kentucky averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,234 adults over 18 or 4.5 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Louisiana

Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of under-21 drinkers among its alcohol-related deaths.

  • 1,591 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 73.6% of deaths are male.
  • 43.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 75.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 5.3% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 50,180 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Louisiana averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,238 adults over 18 or 4.5 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Maine

Maine has one of the nation’s lowest rates of under-21 alcohol-related deaths.

  • 427 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.4% of deaths are male.
  • 57.8% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 87.1% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.3% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 11,375 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Maine averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,566 adults over 18 or 3.9 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Maryland

Maryland has a high rate of under-21 alcohol-related deaths.

  • 1,505 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.4% of deaths are male.
  • 44.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 76.8% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.4% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 46,185 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Maryland averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,129 adults over 18 or 3.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts has one of the nation’s lowest rates of under-21 alcohol-related drinking deaths.

  • 1,744 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.8% of deaths are male.
  • 57.2% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 83.4% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 49,020 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Massachusetts averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,178 adults over 18 or 3.1 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Michigan

Michigan has a slightly higher rate of alcohol-related deaths and female drinking deaths.

  • 3,205 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.0% of deaths are male.
  • 54.4% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 81.7% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.9% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 92,753 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Michigan averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,446 adults over 18 or 4.1 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Minnesota

Alcohol-related deaths are more likely to involve older, female, and chronic users.

  • 1,343 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 69.5% of deaths are male.
  • 56.5% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 85.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 37,011 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Minnesota averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,229 adults over 18 or 3.1 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Mississippi

Mississippi has a high rate of under-21 alcohol-related deaths and the second-highest rate of deaths from acute causes.

  • 954 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 74.1% of deaths are male.
  • 43.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 77.9% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.9% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 29,516 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Mississippi averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,387 adults over 18 or 4.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Missouri

Alcohol-related deaths in Missouri are more likely to involve underage drinkers dead from acute causes.

  • 1,913 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 73.3% of deaths are male.
  • 47.1% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 78.6% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 58,107 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Missouri averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,493 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Montana

Montana has a very high rate of alcohol-related deaths per capita.

  • 416 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.0% of deaths are male.
  • 56.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 82.7% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.6% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 12,289 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Montana averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,019 adults over 18 or 5.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Nebraska

Nebraska ranks below average in the rate of alcohol-related deaths per capita but above average in underage deaths.

  • 460 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 73.0% of deaths are male.
  • 56.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 82.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 12,899 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Nebraska averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,171 adults over 18 or 3.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Nevada

Nevada’s alcohol-related death rate per capita is high, but it has a very low rate of underage deaths.

  • 1,051 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 68.1% of deaths are male.
  • 55.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 84.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.9% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 30,229 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Nevada averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,271 adults over 18 or 4.4 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire has the nation’s lowest rate of under-21 alcohol-related deaths.

  • 421 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.5% of deaths are male.
  • 58.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 86.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 11,389 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • New Hampshire averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,623 adults over 18 or 3.8 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

New Jersey

New Jersey has the second lowest number of alcohol-related deaths per capita after New York.

  • 2,016 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.8% of deaths are male.
  • 51.2% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 80.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 59,604 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • New Jersey averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,445 adults over 18 or 2.9 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

New Mexico

New Mexico has the highest number of alcohol-related deaths per capita among all the states; it’s 31.5% higher than Alaska’s per capita death rate, which is the nation’s second-highest.

  • 1,145 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.1% of deaths are male.
  • 58.6% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 82.1% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.9% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 35,087 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • New Mexico averages one alcohol-related death for every 1,416 adults over 18 or 7.1 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

New York

New York has the lowest number of alcohol-related deaths per capita among all U.S. states.

  • 4,473 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.6% of deaths are male.
  • 55.8% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 83.1% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.2% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 124,315 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • New York averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,449 adults over 18 or 2.9 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

North Carolina

Has a low rate of alcohol-related deaths per capita and a low rate of under-21 deaths.

  • 2,876 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.2% of deaths are male.
  • 50.5% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 81.4% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 85,199 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • North Carolina averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,848 adults over 18 or 3.5 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

North Dakota

Alcohol-related deaths in North Dakota are among the most likely to be due to chronic causes.

  • 216 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.7% of deaths are male.
  • 60.6% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 81.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 6,402 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • North Dakota averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,695 adults over 18 or 3.7 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Ohio

Statistics indicate Ohio’s drinking habits are on par with national averages.

  • 3,674 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.1% of deaths are male.
  • 50.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 81.5% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.5% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 106,752 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Ohio averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,478 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Oklahoma

The rate of alcohol-related deaths per capita is very high in Oklahoma.

  • 1,497 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.9% of deaths are male.
  • 49.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 81.9% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 44,920 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Oklahoma averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,006 adults over 18 or 5.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Oregon

Oregon’s alcohol-related deaths are among the nation’s oldest, with chronic abuse the most significant cause of death.

  • 1,508 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.1% of deaths are male.
  • 64.2% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 88.8% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.1% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 39,705 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Oregon averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,224 adults over 18 or 4.5 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania’s alcohol-related deaths are less likely to be due to chronic causes.

  • 3,843 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.1% of deaths are male.
  • 48.3% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 80.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 111,516 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Pennsylvania averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,645 adults over 18 or 3.8 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Rhode Island

Statistics indicate that underage drinking deaths are not a significant issue in Rhode Island.

  • 339 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.8% of deaths are male.
  • 54.6% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 86.1% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.4% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 9,346 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Rhode Island averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,522 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

South Carolina

South Carolina has more alcohol-related deaths per capita than the average state, and those deaths are 18.1% more likely to involve underage drinkers.

  • 1,679 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.2% of deaths are male.
  • 49.0% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 80.2% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.3% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 50,141 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • South Carolina averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,404 adults over 18 or 4.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

South Dakota

South Dakota has an elevated rate of alcohol-related deaths per capita and a high rate of under-21 deaths.

  • 283 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 68.2% of deaths are male.
  • 59.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 80.2% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.6% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 8,681 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • South Dakota averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,360 adults over 18 or 4.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Tennessee

Alcohol-related deaths in Tennessee are much more likely to involve acute causes.

  • 2,151 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.5% of deaths are male.
  • 47.8% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 81.7% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 64,392 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Tennessee averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,473 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Texas

Statistics indicate underage drinking may be a significant problem in Texas.

  • 7,245 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.7% of deaths are male.
  • 52.3% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 79.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 219,901 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Texas averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,982 adults over 18 or 3.4 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Utah

Utah has the second-highest rate of female alcohol-related deaths and has the highest percentage of deaths due to acute causes.

  • 686 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 67.8% of deaths are male.
  • 42.3% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 77.6% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 4.2% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 21,937 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Utah averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,318 adults over 18 or 3.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Vermont

Alcohol-related deaths in Vermont are average, but under-21 deaths are among the lowest nationwide.

  • 203 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.9% of deaths are male.
  • 63.5% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 88.2% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.5% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 5,085 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Vermont averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,511 adults over 18 or 4.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Virginia

Virginia has fewer alcohol-related deaths per capita than most other states.

  • 2,011 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 71.8% of deaths are male.
  • 52.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 81.3% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.7% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 58,540 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Virginia averages one alcohol-related death for every 3,319 adults over 18 or 3.0 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Washington

Underage drinkers are slightly less common among alcohol-related deaths in Washington.

  • 2,214 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 68.4% of deaths are male.
  • 59.7% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as Alcohol Use Disorder.
  • 86.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 60,508 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Washington averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,690 adults over 18 or 3.7 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

West Virginia

Statistics indicate West Virginia has a significant problem with alcohol abuse. As with Kentucky, the rate of poisoning deaths is exceptionally high at 25.5%.

  • 738 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.8% of deaths are male.
  • 44.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 82.8% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 2.4% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 22,087 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • West Virginia averages one alcohol-related death for every 1,940 adults over 18 or 5.2 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Wisconsin

Alcohol-related deaths in Wisconsin are more likely to involve older, long-term users.

  • 1,737 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 70.8% of deaths are male.
  • 57.1% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as alcoholism.
  • 84.0% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.2% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 48,122 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Wisconsin averages one alcohol-related death for every 2,621 adults over 18 or 3.8 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

Wyoming

Wyoming has one of the nation’s highest rates of alcohol-related deaths per capita.

  • 237 annual deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use.
  • 72.2% of deaths are male.
  • 54.9% of deaths are due to chronic causes, such as long-term alcohol abuse.
  • 80.6% of deaths are among those 35 years old or older.
  • 3.8% are under 21.
  • The CDC estimates 7,329 years of total potential life lost to alcohol.
  • Wyoming averages one alcohol-related death for every 1,878 adults over 18 or 5.3 deaths for every 10,000 adults.

National Map: Average Potential Life Years Lost per Alcohol-Related Death

Sources

  1. National Library of Medicine (NLM), Alcohol and COVID-19
  2. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Alcohol Facts and Statistics
  3. NLM, High-Intensity Drinking
  4. NLM, Alcohol Consumption during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Survey of US Adults
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Alcohol and Public Health: Alcohol-Related Disease Impact Application
  6. CDC, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  7. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Children Living With Parents Who Have a Substance Use Disorder
  8. World Health Organization, Fact Sheets: Alcohol
  9. U.S. Census Bureau, Quick Facts Tables
  10. Nielsen, Rebalancing the COVID-19 Effect on Alcohol Sales